Online consultation: Partnerships that fill a gap in TB prevention, care and/or control

The 42nd Union World Conference on Lung Health will be held in Lille, France, on 26–30 October 2011 on the theme: "Partnerships for scaling up and care." The theme highlights the vital importance of collaboration in our common efforts to address the conditions affecting lung health. The CNS (www.citizen-news.org) is facilitating a time-limited online consultation in lead up to the above conference focussed on the following GUIDING QUESTION: What are the different types of groups, people, organizations or entities you have partnered with to fill a gap in TB prevention, care and/or control. 

We will like you to speak your world and share your experiences of how you began the partnership, how did you convince the other entity of the benefits of entering into the partnership (whether formal or not) as well as what has worked and what has not. 

TIMELINE
The online consultation is open from Monday, 3rd October to Friday, 21st October 2011, after which a summary report will be published and used by the CNS on-site writers' team at Lille 2011.

HOW CAN YOU HAVE YOUR SAY?
- Email us your comments, perspectives and experiences at: stopTB@citizen-news.org
- Go online and publish your comments real time!
- Email the Stop-TB eForum at: stop-tb@eforums.healthdev.org (to join Stop-TB eForum, send an email to: join-stop-tb@eforums.healthdev.org)
- Skype us and we will record your statement (skype id: bobbyramakant ). To schedule skype appointment, email: bobby@citizen-news.org
- Tweet us! use #tag #Lille2011
- Have your say on our CNS Facebook page!
- Call us and record your statement! (+91-98390-73355)

Looking forward to a meaningful dialogue,

CNS: www.citizen-news.org
Email: stopTB@citizen-news.org

46 comments:

  1. This is PCI's [US and Mexico] response:

    PCI works in tuberculosis (TB) in Mexico since the year 2000. Over the years, the main and strongest partnership of our program (an NGO) has been with the Ministry of Health's National Tuberculosis Program (NTP); the NTP provides its technical expertise and infrastructure and PCI through its SOLUCION TB Program provides the knowhow of working with affected and vulnerable communities; a strong element of this partnership has been the advocacy, communication and social mobilization (ACSM) strategies.

    An important innovation of our joint approach consisted of the 'appropriation' of a person-centered model of service delivery and mechanisms that foster community empowerment and work to reduce stigma and discrimination. Through this collaborative platform PCI's SOLUCION TB the NTP Program and state partners, have collaborated with community-based organizations, service clubs (such as Rotary Club); municipal governments, and private agencies such as Universities, businesses, and others. Presently, PCI is working in five locations in Mexico strengthening collaboration among TB and co-morbidities (Diabetes Mellitus and HIV/AIDS) Programs.

    Thanks

    Blanca Lomeli
    Regional Director
    US and Mexico Programs, PCI
    Email: BLomeli@pciglobal.org
    Website: www.PCIGlobal.org
    Website: www.SOLUCIONTB.org

    ReplyDelete
  2. There has been efforts in collaborations in the last few months with patients suffering from TB and intravenous drug users at certain levels and this has been a herculean effort.

    Dr Shanta Ghatak
    Email: drshantaghatak@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  3. The structured partnership mechanism set up by Stop TB Partnership as par the Nigeria Stop TB Partnership has not worked due to so many reasons including interim National Committee's inability to function.

    However, at informal level partnership for TB control and care has worked and is an effective tool for TB control and care.

    Through our organisation advocacy efforts, we have been able to form informal partnership with community leaders and community members, thus involving and selecting community volunteers for TB case finding. Also informal partnership with primary health centres in the community has helped to educate TB patients on drug adherence and other issues. Partnership with other CSOs have added impetus to the commemoration of world TB day.

    Chibuike Amaechi
    Lagos, Nigeria
    Email: good2neighbour@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
  4. Managing partnerships is always a challenge. It is easy to walk out of partnerships due to differences or other reasons and much more a challenge to make them work!

    INCREASING PARTICIPATION
    1. All partners must realize (especially those more in power) that by increasing participation and representation they will strengthen the partnership as a whole and achieve much more than they will ever individually or in smaller groups.

    IMPROVING COORDINATION
    2. The partnership needs to be coordinated well and in such a way so as to stimulate more inclusion of partners in strategies, decision making and other areas such as advocacy planning at all levels. Smaller partners are not there just to implement what the big partners decide.

    Jitendra Dwivedi, Abhinav Bharat Foundation (ABF)
    Email: tambakoo.kills@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  5. Transparency within the partnership is very important indeed especially when it comes to financial matters.

    Aslam Khwaja, Pakistan

    ReplyDelete
  6. Partnerships should make sure that louder voices don't dominate - and - they are truly driven by the communities even if governments and big NGOs and donors are a part of it.

    Garima Patel

    ReplyDelete
  7. ISSUES AROUND GOVERNANCE

    The existing programme management systems or programme management functions are not fully competent to facilitate the process of desired changes. I feel there are gaps both in management structures as well as the management procedures. It is better to re-look into all those things and revitalize the systems.

    There are certain key issues which affects the governance and management systems also.

    1. The conflict of interest - the members or their affiliates receive the funds - directly or indirectly
    2. Tokenistic participation in programme planning
    3. Incompetency in the monitoring systems
    4. Unrealistic capacity building systems

    These issues have to be addressed properly to strengthen the programmes.

    Satheesh
    www.somaindia.org
    Email: somasatheesh@yahoo.com
    (first published in May 2011)

    ReplyDelete
  8. STATE-WISE PARTNERSHIPS

    I think we should try to build more affective state wise partnership for all the countries so that we are more focused and bring in more valuable results in terms of achieving the desire targets.

    Pankaj Dev
    Email: pankajdev73@gmail.com
    (first published in May 2011)

    ReplyDelete
  9. DISTRICT PARTNERSHIPS SHOULD FEED INTO STATE, REGIONAL and NATIONAL

    Facilitating a platform for civil society on TB or any single issue is always a challenge. For countries such as India, where state to state situation might change, it is very important to have strong district or village level partnerships which feed into state partnerships, which may set the agenda of regional or national partnerships.

    This is also about HONEST REPRESENTATION - so that every stakeholder has equal rights (and fair opportunities) of participation and access to mechanism to influence the agenda.

    Jitendra Dwivedi, India
    Email: jitendraabf@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  10. MONEY CAN THREATEN GOOD PARTNERSHIPS- DOUBLE EDGE SWORD

    Even without money, voluntary partnerships of civil society or diverse stakeholders is never easy to manage - if we want to protect real values a partnership should uphold.

    With money things can become more difficult if we are not careful. It is a double edge sword.

    Kiran Jaiswar, India

    ReplyDelete
  11. It is always important to look at the constitution of partnership vis-a-vis the purpose of establishing them. If partnership is constituted by only influential and vocal groups and agencies, it might be useful for advocacy purpose but then it would not be helpful for raising the voice of grassroots NGO who will feel stifled.

    Partnerships can be a means of mobilising resources for the partners. However in most cases the resource mobilisation is from external sources and there is no self-sustainability plan available. When money dries, the partnership withers. When we talk of partnerships, there is tendency to think of just one body/ platform. Several countries often have multiple partners with different strengths. In such cases having more than one partnership could also be explored to strengthen voice of several constituencies. It is also important for partnerships to strike a balance between alignment with national policies and strategies, and keeping an independent voice that helps feed into strengthening these policies through a watchdog approach.

    Dr Vineet Bhatia
    Samm Health International Pvt Ltd
    Email: vineetbhatia_2000@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
  12. Resources should be preserved to encourage patients access and complete TB treatment. For example, incentives for patients like food during the clinic visits, facilitation for the clinicians to home visit or call the patients that do not pick their pills etc. Finally a broad approach to health should be put on emphasis on improved nutrition of the communities/countries most affected by TB.

    Dr Charles Namisi
    Email: charlespcn@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  13. GOVERNMENT SHOULD BE SUPPORTIVE FIRST OF CIVIL SOCIETY PARTNERSHIPS

    Governments should give an equal opportunity for civil society to get engaged in TB responses. In many countries, it is difficult to believe that governments will not 'control' such partnerships thereby negating all the good we want to achieve by civil society engagement.

    Nadeem Ahmad, UAE

    ReplyDelete
  14. CAN WE AGREE ON THE AGENDA FOR SUCH A PARTNERSHIP?

    Without a unifying and common or shared agenda such discussions of working in partnerships and then partners working amongst each other will go in circles. The donors should invest money in shaping such a platform where members can agree on an agenda reflecting needs of communities, mobilize resources and implement effectively.

    Dr Shrestha, Nepal

    ReplyDelete
  15. COORDINATED RESPONSE IS A CHALLENGE
    NOT A PARTNERSHIP WHERE SOME ARE MORE EQUAL THAN OTHERS

    Partnerships exist - but to strengthen them will require a platform where all members can participate as equals - not a partnership where some are more equal than others. That is why coordinated response is a challenge - especially when dominating government agencies and their handpicked or favourite NGOs rule the show.

    Arshad Ahmad, Pakistan

    ReplyDelete
  16. GOVERNMENT WORKERS ARE NOT VERY MUCH WILLING TO LET GO THEIR CONTROL

    We youth in Wote (Kenya) have been advocating for full participation of the community particularly those who suffer or have had TB and have trained 180 community workers.

    We have partnered with the government health workers to do so but it has not been easy. The government workers are not very much willing to let go their control. This makes it very difficult to implement the community strategy. An example is where the monthly stipend does not reach the MDR-TB patients because the money passes through the government (gets delayed or is stuck) and the patient don't get it and if a CSO makes noise then the government avoids working with that CSO which is a trouble maker for them.

    My take is to empower the CSO more because it's easier for the government to legally supervise them.

    Peter Ngola
    Wote Youth Development Projects, Kenya
    Email: pngola@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
  17. UNDUE INFLUENCE FROM DONORS TO DANCE TO THEIR TUNES

    Donors sometimes interfere in an unbridled fashion with country strategies and interventions that seek to fill the gap in TB care and control. Why? Simply put, they hold the money bag. They could saddle program managers with unnecessary demands and alterations of budget estimates. How could you financially support home-grown and country- specific tailored interventions while at the same time seek to interfere with the implementation process. This smacks of double standard.

    Eric Aborgah
    NPHRL, Korlebu
    Ghana
    Email: eraborgah@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
  18. PARTNERSHIPS SHOULD ENGAGE SMALL NGOs/ CBOs, SMALL CITIES

    Not only smaller NGOs and community based organizations (CBOs) are not well represented unless "hand-picked" or "selected" by bigger entities in big cities - not because of ill intention but because of lack of such a mechanism where so many people in big countries like India can participate - and represent with dignity, but also there are other issues that increase the likelihood that bigger NGOs in big cities will continue to dominate - like language. Most proceedings are in English - and even if we know English, the jargon used is less familiar for smaller partners that work in community setting.

    Jitendra Dwivedi, India
    Email: jitendraabf@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  19. SUPPORT PARTNERSHIPS ONLY IF THEY ARE RUN BY COMMUNITIES

    One way to make sure that the partnerships are community driven is to ensure that these are not run by governments - and - get direct funding or support. We need to trust the competence of civil society - and - its ability to learn, organize and innovate when given a chance. Give it a chance.

    Amir Siddiqui, Saudi Arabia

    ReplyDelete
  20. I am in support of Triangular partnership where as Government, Civil Society and Private sector to address the three pandemics. This should always start from planning to implementation level.

    Richard Kasesela, Tanzania
    Email: rkasesela@gmail.com
    (first published in May 2011)

    ReplyDelete
  21. PARTNERSHIPS SHOULD MAKE EARLY TB DIAGNOSIS POSSIBLE

    It will be very important element to have early TB diagnosis. This will avoid TB cases to increase. People at times fear to go to the clinics because they feel when the TB has became so strong on the last stage they feel they will be stigmatized and discriminated at the clinic by their fellow patients, the community when they go outside the house and even their own families.

    There should be a mechanism like mandatory testing in all clinics, in order to avoid late diagnosis.

    Fred Mwansa
    Email: fredmwansa@yahoo.ca

    ReplyDelete
  22. What Partnership?

    Between government and private institutions?

    The government with its funds and hardware (money, medicine, medical and
    other supplies) on the one side. On the other side the private institutions with their (better and efficient) software.

    Good partnership only can exist, if mutual trust and respect can be
    realized. If not, competition, jealousy even animosity, may be inevitable.

    Anonymus

    ReplyDelete
  23. LANGUAGE AND STYLE SHOULD NOT INTIMIDATE

    Often the language and style used by big agencies is such that it intimidates smaller NGOs and community based organizations. For effective partnerships that protect small voices it is important to ensure it doesn’t happen.

    Geetanjali, India

    ReplyDelete
  24. Partnership is a very important in campaigning or implementing program which is aimed at reaching out the poorer and the most vulnerable people in the community. Government as a stakeholders who have big responsibility to provide services of their people are not able to serve the community fairly.

    In most cases, more people complain and complain with the lack of government services. I would like to suggest as follows:

    First, build wider partnership with not only the government bodies, but also NGOs at various levels which reaches the local NGO which are very close with the sufferers.

    Second, the partnership should be designed in different levels such as policy level, and implementing level.

    Third, it must be clear what roles played by each party. The partnership must also put priority in building networking for socializing the three issues in the community worldwide.

    There must be more attention for the developing countries.

    Tabrani Yunis, Indonesia
    Director
    Center for Community Development and Education (CCDE)
    Editor of POTRET (grassroots woman magazine)
    Emails: ccde.aceh@gmail.com, potret.ccde@gmail.com
    Website: www.ccde.or.id

    ReplyDelete
  25. PRACTISING...THEN PREACHING!

    I have been following some of the TB/HIV discussions here and would like to add that the time has come for all NGOs and networks to develop their own workplace policies related to HIV, gender, SRHR and TB in order to reduce staff vulnerability and build an enabling workplace.

    Our research of a pilot programme in south India demonstrated the need for this strategy in tackling stigma, even in NGOs with focussed HIV programmes too. "Self care", "getting our own house in order", "ensuring all are on board with HIV related empowerment", "practice before preaching" are some of the CSO learnings that ensures meaningful delivery to communities being targetted.

    For more information on managing HIV in the CSO workplace, or for facilitation of the same, do get in touch. Our work has been supported with applied research from baseline to end line (south) . We are presently ensuring this process for 35 CSOs in Delhi MP UP Chhatisgarh and FBOs in Karnataka.

    When staff are empowered beyond trainings through a workplace policy programme, the scope of the CSO is meaningfully widened.

    Edwina Pereira
    Program Director-training
    International Services Association
    INSA India
    Bangalore, India
    Email: insaind@airtelmail.in, san-sip@airtelmail.in
    Website: www.theinsaindia.org

    ReplyDelete
  26. BUILDING A SOLID RELATIONSHIP BASED ON TRUST, UNDERSTANDING, SINCERITY, AND FLEXIBILITY HAS ENABLED US TO CREATE A FAMILY FEELING FOR THE INDIVIDUALS AND ORGANIZATIONS WE HAVE PARTNER WITH OVER THE YEARS

    TB Photovoice has been working collaboratively with TB organizations from around the world since 2006. The mission of TB Photovoice is to facilitate the use images, stories and dialogue to elevate the voices of individuals directly impacted by tuberculosis so that they as well as their communities can improve their overall health. When we speak of gaps in TB prevention, care and/or control, the very creation of TB Photovoice was due to the lack of perspective at all levels from persons directly impacted from TB.

    In order to accomplish our mission, we must first and foremost provide respect for the individuals and agencies we work with, whether they are the person directly impacted by TB or the staff of a TB organization we are training to implement a photovoice project.

    Building a solid relationship based on trust, understanding, sincerity, and flexibility has enabled us to create a family feeling for the individuals and organizations we have partner with over the years. We have worked with local health jurisdictions, private and public TB organizations, universities, government agencies, advocacy/education organizations, media outlets, individual donors, churches, and community businesses. We have never convinced a group to work with us. Rather, we enter a mutual partnership when asked by an organization to work with them. We listen to their needs and together we decide how best to provide our skills and resources. Since we are clear on our goals as an organization, it is up to us to listen to a partnering group to understand their perspective and together build a positive, working relationship.

    Teresa L Rugg, MPH
    TB Photovoice
    Project Director
    7619 137th Ave. SE
    Snohomish, WA 98290 USA
    Email: twrugg@frontier.com
    Website: www.tbphotovoice.org

    ReplyDelete
  27. DRUG RESISTANT MALARIA AND TB: ENGAGE DIFFERENT SPECIALITIES AND HEALTHCARE WORKERS

    There is still lack of awareness on the treatment strategy on the management of drug resistant malaria and tuberculosis with the result people are dying of these diseases. A panel discussion involving clinicians, epidemiologist, microbiologist and administrative health authorities at several centres in high burden countries will go a long way in reducing the impact. Give us opportunity to be a partner in this war against these difficult microbes.

    Dr V P Gopinathan, Trichur, India
    Jubilee Mission Medical College, Trichur
    Email: vpgopinathan@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  28. ACTION IS AT STATE LEVEL

    In big countries like India, state to state issues and contexts change so real effective and strong civil society led partnerships should be at the state level, not just national level in metropolitan cities. These state partnerships should strengthen responses to TB and feed into national mechanisms including those like CCMs.

    Gautam Sikka, India

    ReplyDelete
  29. COMMUNITIES SHOULD CHOOSE THEIR REPRESENTATIVES

    Communities should choose their representatives in such national partnerships. For example, why should a handful of people be selected to represent certain communities? Why cannot communities be given a right and empowered enough to select their own representatives in an open and transparent manner? Unless this happens, voices of those on the margin will continue to be faint, weak if heard at all.

    Rahul Kumar, India
    Email: contactrahullko@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  30. GENDER

    These partnerships on TB must ensure they have well representation of different genders. Preferably they should be led by other genders than a man. It is important to recognize and let other genders take leadership and be given such opportunities - and supported by the entire partnership when they convene.

    For example, in western UP which is a very patriarchal society, unless women are engaged in leadership roles, how else will TB programmes become gender sensitive to their needs, challenges and what works and what doesn't work with them? So is true for others in more severity like transgender populations - these are important voices and communities know best - and only these voices can help programmes reach the unreached.

    Shobha Shukla
    Managing Editor
    Citizen News Service (CNS)
    Email: shobha@citizen-news.org

    ReplyDelete
  31. ONE PARTNERSHIP - ONE RESPONSE

    Civil society has been so fragmented and it is important for the different stakeholders to give up petty issues and come together as one partnership for a coordinated response in action.

    Ritesh Arya, India
    Email: ritesharya45@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
  32. I agree with Gautam Sikka, India that in a big country like India it would pay better dividends if the tie up is with states rather the central ministries.

    Dr Lalji K Verma, India
    Email: vermalk@bol.net.in

    ReplyDelete
  33. It's important to involve civil society because of I often see in development sector government programme performance is not satisfactory however if along with government civil society gets the proper opportunity definitely progress will be seen.

    We also have to stop thinking that civil society cannot do the work properly.

    We should consider those organizations that are working well but lack proper knowledge, communication skill or other such tools that can be helped with.

    CGPVS Surguja, India
    Email: scgpvs@yahoo.in
    (first published in May 2011)

    ReplyDelete
  34. LET LOCAL PEOPLE DRIVE PARTNERSHIPS

    We should respect and let local people drive in-country partnerships -they know the best and solutions rest with them.

    A Flecke, Vietnam

    ReplyDelete
  35. MONEY MAKES IT MORE DIFFICULT TO HAVE GENUINE PARTNERSHIPS

    We need to be careful, very careful while managing partnerships in terms of financial or fiscal accountability and make sure that money should not weaken or fragment rather strengthen in-country partnerships.

    Gurmeet Singh, India

    ReplyDelete
  36. HOW CAN CIVIL SOCIETY HAVE RIGHTS IN HEALTH AND NOT IN GOVERNANCE?

    What about nations where civil society generally is struggling for basic rights and is expected to run democratic, ideal, equitable and just partnerships on TB? Is it because of the funding? That is why our responses on TB must accommodate programmes addressing social determinants of health.

    Saeeda Ebrahim, Afghanistan

    ReplyDelete
  37. WHY SHOULD WE SET THE AGENDA AT LOCAL LEVEL?

    Why are we talking that local networks should talk about TB and then feed into state or national networks? It should be the local people who need to decide what are the key health issues that challenge them on day to day basis - not us! We should at best facilitate and support this process - where local people can identify their issues - and - find solutions and resources to improve programme responses on the ground.

    Rahul Kumar, India
    Email: contactrahullko@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  38. EXISTING NETWORKS

    In many countries already country wide networks exist - we should invest in strengthening these for a coordinated response on health.

    T Bahn, Cambodia

    ReplyDelete
  39. COORDINATED RESPONSE WITHOUT COMMON AGENDA?

    For a coordinated response at a country level on TB it is important for the different partnerships in a country (professionals, activists, government, NGOs, etc) to coordinate with each other. Without a common shared agenda for advocacy and action, it will be more difficult.

    Zafar Kidwai, Bangladesh

    ReplyDelete
  40. National partnerships to stop tuberculosis (TB) bring varied partners together to develop and implement shared action plans to tackle TB.

    The partnering process allows national partnerships to maximize the efforts of existing state and non-state actors; bring more services and awareness-raising campaigns to the people, where they are; give a unified voice to non-state partners; and serve as a platform to develop funding proposals and implement grants.

    If you do not already have a national partnership, now is right time to start. The financial crisis, TB-HIV co-infection and the rise of drug-resistant TB are stretching the resources of TB programmes around the world. This makes the case for founding a national partnership through the partnering process all the more compelling.

    The partnering process consists of three steps:

    1) conduct a workshop to confirm a shared vision between all partners and map the resources that each partner can contribute;

    2) develop a shared national TB plan which has clear roles and responsibilities for each partner based on their strengths;

    3) mobilize resources and implement a shared national TB plan.

    The added value of a partnering approach has been verified by existing national partnerships. Swaziland Stop TB Partnership reports: “Thanks to the partnership, the national manager can focus on performing its core coordination role, while partners’ activities are streamlined through identification of areas of comparative advantage. The coordination of activities with the national TB strategic plan has been implemented and quarterly monitoring and evaluation meetings have been under taken. Through the partnership’s joint planning, additional resources have been secured, mainly from the Global Fund”.

    For more information about the partnering process, please visit our website: www.stoptb.org/countries/partnerships/ and our new leaflet: www.stoptb.org/assets/documents/countries/partnerships/National%20partnerships%20to%20stop%20tuberculosis.pdf describing the added value of the partnering approach.

    Elisabetta Minelli
    Partnership Officer
    Stop TB Partnership Secretariat
    Geneva, Switzerland
    Email: minellie@who.int

    ReplyDelete
  41. PRINCIPLES OF EQUITY

    People who are doing the service provision on the frontlines are least remunerated - and those sitting on top of TB responses either at the state, country or global level, are heavily remunerated - compare the remuneration please. That is why healthcare workers on the frontlines in developing countries want to move to greener pastures. This inequity has to stop in the development sector and let us have some balance to strengthen country responses to TB.

    Jitendra Dwivedi, India
    Email: Jitendraabf@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  42. AGENDAS ARE DIFFERENT AND SO COORDINATION DIFFICULT

    There are so many partnerships that exist in India on a range of issues but coordination between them seems impossible. Even within them there are problems of EXCLUSION at times.

    D Kapadia, India

    ReplyDelete
  43. RISING ABOVE ORGANIZATIONAL MANDATES

    It is important for all partnership members to rise above organizational mandates, projects and programmes and come together for an effective advocacy on an agreed issue. Unless the government agencies on TB recognise this partnership and unless civil society recognises this partnership as their platform where they too have a voice, such efforts will not bear fruits.

    Bathiudeen, Sri Lanka

    ReplyDelete
  44. RELIGION AND HEALTH

    One effective way to strengthen civil society networks for health agencies is to work closely and effectively with religious and faith based networks. It has shown to work in many settings and at community level still binds people together.

    Azim Karim, Brunei Darussalam

    ReplyDelete
  45. Please find the response for the queries as requested:

    How did the partnership begin?

    * The Partnership has its roots in a Round 8 proposal for the Global Fund when a united 16 members of the India Coalition Against TB and 9 of the NGO TB Consortium came together under a common goal in March 2008. In August 2008, USAID supported a 'Jump-Start Project' through a World Vision grant for this collaboration. The national Partnership finally evolved in a meeting attended by 44 organisations in New Delhi in November 2008, and a working group was constituted in December 2008 to streamline its agenda.

    * In January 2009, a Secretariat was appointed and hosted in the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (The Union) followed by a first meeting of the working group and the process was initiated to form the Steering Committee. In March 2009, the Partnership's first monthly newsletter- came out and a draft Memorandum of Association was circulated. 13 partners signed it in April and the first Steering Committee meeting was held in May . By June 2009, a Charter of the Partnership's vision, values and goals was drafted, and a website is functional www.tbpartnershipindia.org

    Dr Darivianca Elliotte Laloo
    Technical Officer
    Secretariat Partnership for TB care and Control in India
    Hosted by; The Union South-East Asia office
    New Delhi, India
    Email: DLaloo@theunion.org
    Website: www.tbpartnershipindia.org

    ReplyDelete
  46. WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF GROUPS, PEOPLE, ORGANIZATIONS, OR ENTITIES YOU HAVE PARTNERED WITH TO FILL A GAP IN TUBERCULOSIS (TB) PREVENTION, CARE, AND/ OR CONTROL?

    * The 'Partnership for Tuberculosis Care and Control in India' (the Partnership) brings together civil society across the country on a common platform to support and strengthen India's national TB control efforts. It seeks to harness the strengths and expertise of partners in various technical and implementation areas, and to empower affected communities, in TB care and control.

    * It consists of technical agencies, non-governmental organizations, community-based organizations, affected communities, the corporate sector, professional bodies, media and academia and is presently 90 partners strong.

    WHAT ARE THE 'VALUE ADDED' ON HAVING A PARTNERSHIP?

    The Partnership has added value in many ways:

    1) Unity - PTCC provides a voice of a unified civil society in engaging with the government in TB care and control through efforts like providing recommendations into the program planning (RNTCP) phase III. PTCC is recognized by the program, has a representation in the working group for RNTCP III planning and in the National Coordination committee for Global Fund Round 9.

    2) Service - PTCC has been successful in getting the Global Fund Round 9 for ACSM covering 740 million population which strengthens community mobilisation in the fight against TB.

    3) Trust -PTCC is building trust and collaboration between multiple sectors involved in TB care and control initiatives, through national and regional consultations, with equal participation from all sectors to brainstorm on collaborative efforts and have various channels for communication and sharing of experiences among partners.

    4) Capacity building – PTCC sought the expertise from among the partners to train others i.e. ACSM (through PATH) and engaging with media (through media partners and funded by Eli Lilly).

    WHAT ARE THE CHALLENGES YOU FACED?
    Some of the challenges faced during the formation and functioning of the Partnership include interacting with the different mindset of a variety of partners from diverse sectors ,defining roles and responsibilities of the partnership acceptable to all stakeholders; and defining a governance system maintaining equal representation.

    WHAT WORKED?
    The defining of the common goal which is ‘to support and strengthen India's national TB control efforts’ through a range of expertise working from a unified response through the partnership.

    It is the harnessing of these strengths and competencies that the partnership can support the program through specific requirements.

    Dr Darivianca Elliotte Laloo
    Technical Officer
    Secretariat Partnership for TB care and Control in India
    Hosted by; The Union South-East Asia office
    New Delhi, India
    Email: DLaloo@theunion.org
    Website: www.tbpartnershipindia.org

    ReplyDelete