Existence of civil society is under threat

Dr Ian Hodgson, CNS (Citizen News Service) 
Gandhi ji's Talisman
CNS Image Library: Gandhi Settlement, Durban/ 2018
The increasing repression of civil society was a major theme that emerged during the recently concluded 22nd International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2018) in Amsterdam. A range of presentations and discussions confirmed that, in many countries, like Hungary, Russia, Venezuela, and the Philippines, the civil society space for HIV prevention is diminishing with the introduction of new laws and policies that are aimed at minimising access to human rights and jeopardising the health and well-being of key populations.

Where are the nurses in the HIV response?

Dr Ian Hodgson, CNS (Citizen News Service)
Since the beginning of the HIV epidemic, nurses have been at the forefront of the response to this once fatal infection. The nurse is involved at every stage of the trajectory of a person living with HIV—from usually being the first to counsel the newly diagnosed person, to one of the last to be with him/her at the point of death.

Slump in fight against #AIDS can derail progress made so far!

Shobha Shukla, CNS (Citizen News Service)
[Podcast] “Tremendous progress against AIDS over the past 15 years has inspired a global commitment to end the epidemic by 2030. Out of the total 36.9 million people living with HIV (PLHIV) globally, 21.7 million of them were on antiretroviral therapy (ART) by 2017. But we should also note that 1.8 million people were newly infected with HIV in 2017" said Dr Ishwar Gilada, who was Chairing a session at 22nd International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2018) in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Will approach of 'breaking barriers and building bridges' accelerate progress to #endAIDS?

Dr Prakash Tyagi, CNS (Citizen News Service)
From CNS files: 2 years old photo but even more relevant!
A number of aspects stand out clearly from the 22nd International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2018). Firstly, the conference has the largest ever participation of younger people, recognizing the importance of the roles youth play and the contributions they can make in the global efforts of controlling the pandemic within their communities and beyond.

Ending AIDS, the Dutch way

Shobha Shukla, CNS (Citizen News Service)
Alphonsus Stoelinga, Netherlands Ambassador to India
We are all very familiar with the phrase ‘going Dutch’ (meaning each person of a group pays one's own expenses in an outing), but are we also aware of dealing with HIV/AIDS the Dutch way? Perhaps very few of us know that "Amsterdam, which is currently hosting the 22nd International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2018) from 23-27th July 2018 - the largest conference for any global health issue in the world - became the first city in the world to overshoot the 90:90:90 target, set by UNAIDS (joint United Nations programme on HIV/AIDS), in 2017 itself with a continuum progress of 94:90:94,” said Alphonsus Stoelinga, Netherlands Ambassador to India, in an exclusive interview given to CNS (Citizen News Service) on the eve of AIDS 2018.

[Call for application] Be Different: Become a part of Bimla Misra Memorial Health Fellowship Programme 2018-2019

[Click here to apply] CNS team is pleased to announce that we are currently accepting applications for new Fellows for Bimla Misra Memorial Health Fellowship Programme 2018-2019.

Are you willing to be different, and:
  • Be the change you want to see in the world?
  • See things differently, and strive for a better tomorrow?
  • Challenge the status quo, and think and act differently, to make sustainable development a reality for all - where no one is left behind?
  • Focus on issues that matter to people most in need?

Social entrepreneurship: Partnership platforms for sustainable societies

Shobha Shukla, CNS (Citizen News Service)
Dr Marie Lisa Dacanay, President of the Institute for Social Entrepreneurship in Asia, defines social entrepreneurship as ‘a game changing strategy to mainstream social enterprises to help the poor/ marginalized and women at the grassroots become key partners in multi-stakeholder innovation platforms for developing inclusive, sustainable economies; and to partake of the value and wealth created in ways that transform their lives and communities’.

Secondhand smoke is bad for the heart

Dr Amitava Acharyya, CNS Correspondent, India
It has been known for long a time now that active cigarette smoking is an established risk factor for heart diseases. However, a large percentage of us are ignorant of the toxic effects of secondhand smoke—inhalation of cigarette, bidi, hookah smoke or inhalation of smoke produced by burning of coal or wood as fuel for cooking. This second hand smoking or passive smoking too is harmful and can lead to many diseases—like coronary obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, stroke, hypertension, cancer, peripheral vascular disease, sudden infant death syndrome, low birth weight etc.

Defending the environmental defenders

Shobha Shukla, CNS (Citizen News Service)
Violations of the environmental rights of communities and individuals are on the rise in Asia Pacific and worldwide. Statistics released by Global Witness reveals that in 2017, 197 people were killed (on an average 4 per week) for defending their land and/or natural resources, underscoring the escalating violence in a global economy that is driven by expansion and consumption through corrupt and unjust practices. Extractive industries were one of the deadliest drivers of violence.

Climate justice is integral to development justice

Shobha Shukla, CNS (Citizen News Service)
Climate justice is integral to development justice, as it is essential for building a brave feminist future sans power and wealth inequalities. This is the dream of feminists in the Asia Pacific region, including Misun Woo, who recently took over charge as the Regional Coordinator for APWLD (Asia Pacific Forum on Women, Law and Development). A law graduate from New York University School of Law, Misun Woo, is deeply committed to a feminist movement building to dismantle the current patriarchal structures and systems that are violating women’s human rights, deepening inequalities and fuelling conflicts.

Smokeless tobacco under gender lens

Dr Sophia Thomas, CNS Correspondent, India
The first World No Tobacco Day (WNTD) was observed on 31 May 1988, a year after this global campaign was created during the World Health Assembly by the World Health Organization. The objective of WNTD was to encourage all persons worldwide who smoke or chew tobacco to quit for at least 24 hours. Ironically, a simple google search of “World No Tobacco Day” brings up a series of images showing cigarettes being shunned in creative ways. The current theme of WNTD focuses on effects of tobacco on cardiovascular health and is depicted as smoke rising from the blood vessels of the heart. Unfortunately, most of the images, depicting the health hazards of tobacco, fail to showcase the harmful effects of ‘smokeless’ forms of tobacco, which are equally harmful.