'We want nuclear-bomb-free and nuclear-energy-free World'

Lessons From Japan 2011 campaign reached Eram Convent Inter College, C-Block Indira Nagar, Lucknow, to raise awareness about nuclear radiation hazards, and promote dialogue and mobilize public opinion among young people for non-nuclear clean energy options. Lessons From Japan campaign will culminate on Hiroshima Day, the 6th August 2011 with a seminar at IMA Bhawan (9-1pm) which will bring together country’s noted experts on nuclear-radiation health hazards, clean energy and nuclear disarmament.

Ms AS Khan, Principal Eram Convent Inter College, Shobha Shukla, former Physics teacher of Loreto Convent and who presently edits CNS: www.citizen-news.org, Rahul Kumar Dwivedi, Director, CNS NMi, and Bobby Ramakant were the key resource faculty.

This campaign is organized under the aegis of Asha Parivar, National Alliance of People's Movements (NAPM), Citizens for Healthy Lucknow (CHL) initiative, and supported by Dr Ram Manohar Lohia Institute of Medical Sciences (RMLIMS), Indian Medical Association (IMA Lucknow), Coalition for Nuclear Disarmament and Peace (CNDP), Indian Doctors for Peace and Development (IDPD), and Jahangirabad Media Institute (JMI).

Recent nuclear emergency in Japan leaves no doubt that this world needs to renounce nuclear power for military and civil/ energy purposes, as soon as possible, to put an end to any further catastrophe in the name of 'energy', 'security' or 'technology'. Nuclear power is clearly the most dangerous options for civil or military use. Countries that have been using nuclear power such as Germany and Japan have resolved to abandon nuclear energy by 2022. Germany converted its semi-finished nuclear energy plant into an amusement park! India needs to vote for clean energy!

The Lessons From Japan 2011 campaign promotes the use of indigenous energy resources such as coal, gas, hydro (small, micro dams or run of the river categories), solar, wind energy, biogas etc., and ensuring our future energy supplies from Iran and other countries in West and Central Asia. Although the Campaign realize that fossil fuel based method of energy production is also harmful contributing to global warming and ideally like European Union and Japan we should aim for a low-carbon energy production system. India’s future energy policy should be low carbon and no nuclear.

TWO FILMS WERE SCREENED: Films containing news clippings of reports of nuclear accidents in INDIA’s nuclear energy plants and on Chernobyl Nuclear Energy accident that was shot by a photo-journalist Vladimir who died due to radiation exposure were screened.

Students of Eram Convent Inter College are making poster exhibits to display on HIROSHIMA DAY, 6th August at IMA Bhawan (9-1 pm). All are invited.

CNS

Published in:
Citizen News Service(CNS), India/Thailand
Elites TV News, California, USA 
Wikio News, Africa

1 comment:

  1. "A World Free of Nuclear Weapons,"" Wall Street Journal By George P. Shultz, William J. Perry, Henry A. Kissinger and Sam Nunn.

    Nuclear weapons today present tremendous dangers, but also an historic opportunity. U.S. leadership will be required to take the world to the next stage -- to a solid consensus for reversing reliance on nuclear weapons globally as a vital contribution to preventing their proliferation into potentially dangerous hands, and ultimately ending them as a threat to the world.

    Nuclear weapons were essential to maintaining international security during the Cold War because they were a means of deterrence. The end of the Cold War made the doctrine of mutual Soviet-American deterrence obsolete. Deterrence continues to be a relevant consideration for many states with regard to threats from other states. But reliance on nuclear weapons for this purpose is becoming increasingly hazardous and decreasingly effective.

    North Korea's recent nuclear test and Iran's refusal to stop its program to enrich uranium -- potentially to weapons grade -- highlight the fact that the world is now on the precipice of a new and dangerous nuclear era. Most alarmingly, the likelihood that non-state terrorists will get their hands on nuclear weaponry is increasing. In today's war waged on world order by terrorists, nuclear weapons are the ultimate means of mass devastation. And non-state terrorist groups with nuclear weapons are conceptually outside the bounds of a deterrent strategy and present difficult new security challenges."

    ReplyDelete