World Diabetes Day 2017: A special focus on women

Dr Amitava Acharyya, CNS Correspondent, India
Worldwide World Diabetes Day (WDD) is held on the 14th of November. The theme of this year’s World Diabetes Day campaign is ‘Women and diabetes - our right to a healthy future’. This theme is aimed at increasing awareness around diabetes in women at risk of or living with diabetes around the world.

Breaking the shackles of patriarchy

Shobha Shukla, CNS (Citizen News Service)
“Men always suppress women. It is for women to think that if they want to live their lives they have to be strong enough and step out of their homes. They should not be scared of ‘what society would say!’. If we are in the right, we do not have to be afraid of anyone. There is no shame in raising your voice against injustice, no matter what others say. Keep your spirits high.”

Latent TB deserves more attention

Dr Amitava Acharyya, CNS Correspondent, India
Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major infectious disease globally. After initial contact with viable TB bacilli, hosts who fail to clear all Mycobacterium TB (M.TB) can progress to the status of latent TB infection (LTBI) and have a life-time risk of 5%–15% to further progress into active disease.

Applied health research for making systems work for all is vital to #endTB

Shobha Shukla, CNS (Citizen News Service)
[Watch video interview] [Listen/ download podcast] "Excellence in health means devoting your life to ending poverty" said physician and comedian Patch Adams many years ago, but these words have gained even more relevance in the current context and development paradigm.

Time to manage diabetes and latent TB

Roger Paul Kamugasha, CNS Correspondent, Uganda
Research has proved that people with diabetes are at high risk of developing active TB disease. This calls for global attention to focus on specific action in order to shift the paradigm of the escalating TB-diabetes burden. These actions should focus on earmarking resources for investment into research, advocacy communication and social mobilization.

Link between diabetes and TB

Dr P S Sarma, CNS Correspondent, India
Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is one disease that can have an adverse affect on many organs of the body. Like wise, it has a great impact on all forms of TB—whether latent or active . People with DM have a high risk of getting TB, more so if they are having  poor diabetes control. Diabetes prevalence is increasing especially is low income settings where TB is already endemic.