People with diabetes more prone to TB

Gugulethu Nyazema, Zimbabwe
(First published in Daily News, Zimbabwe on 25th March 2013): People with diabetes are 2,5 times more likely to develop tuberculosis (TB), according to an international study. The International Diabetes Federation revealed there was a study that showed that people with diabetes are at higher risk of developing TB than those without diabetes. According to the Zimbabwe Diabetes Associations, close to 40 percent of the Zimbabwean population is diabetic.

TB affects 83 000 people annually with two thirds of the sick not treated. Zimbabwe has an infection rate of about 47 000 per year. Ashok Sankpol, a medical doctor with Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières Zimbabwe (MSF) said both diseases are common in immune systems that have been compromised. “We do not have many patients that are diabetic and infected with TB, and diabetes has more to do with habit,” Sankpal said.

He said diabetes makes you prone to many diseases and it weakens the immune system. “It is a chronic disease that makes a patient prone to many diseases. The two become linked if the patient lives in a high density area or in a crowded home with people who are coughing a lot,” he said.

International expert, Dr Lin Yan, Director of International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (The Union) in China said data from the recent study at six TB clinics or hospitals suggested that 12,4 percent of the TB patients having diabetes.

Yan said the challenge of managing the TB and diabetes in diabetes patients would require longer treatment. “Diabetes patients with TB most likely require longer treatment than TB patients without diabetes. Therefore, how to ensure those patients receiving appropriate treatment and take the medicine regularly are the major challenges,” said Dr Yan.

Lenge of managing the TB and diabetes in diabetes patients would require longer treatment. “Diabetes patient with TB most likely require longer treatment than TB patients without diabetes. Therefore how to ensure those patients receiving appropriate treatment and take the medicine regularly are major challenges,” said international experts.

Gugulethu Nyazema, Zimbabwe
Citizen News Service - CNS
(First published in Daily News, Zimbabwe on 25th March 2013)

No comments:

Post a Comment